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Wit and Humor of America, The Vol 07

THE PRAYER OF CYRUS BROWN

BY SAM WALTER FOSS

"The proper way for a man to pray,"
Said Deacon Lemuel Keyes,
"And the only proper attitude
Is down upon his knees."
"No, I should say the way to pray,"
Said Rev. Dr. Wise,
"Is standing straight, with outstretched arms,
And rapt and upturned eyes."
"Oh, no; no, no," said Elder Slow,
"Such posture is too proud;
A man should pray with eyes fast closed
And head contritely bowed."
"It seems to me his hands should be
Austerely clasped in front,
With both thumbs pointing toward the ground,"
Said Rev. Dr. Blunt.
"Las' year I fell in Hodgkin's well
Head first," said Cyrus Brown,
"With both my heels a-stickin' up,
My head a-pinting down.
"An' I made a prayer right then an' there—
Best prayer I ever said.
The prayingest prayer I ever prayed,
A-standing on my head."

"Well told and dramatically strong, it breathes again the spirit of Dumas and Bulwer-Lytton."—Portland Oregonian.

The Palace of Danger

A STORY OF LA POMPADOUR

By MABEL WAGNALLS

Author of "Stars of the Opera," "Miserere," etc.

"There have been few groups of characters who have been used more frequently in fiction than the members of the court of Louis XV., and there have been few attempts to make romance of their lives that are quite so delightful as this story. Around the heroine and hero Miss Wagnalls has spun a tale that has the quality of holding the reader's attention from first page to last. It is charged with dramatic movement and a wealth and charm of style."—New York Press.

"A powerful novel, exciting, interesting, and well worked out."—San Francisco Examiner.

"The author has shown skill in the use of her materials."—Boston Globe.

"It is a thoroughly human story, and so well constructed that the interest holds one to the end."—The Review of Reviews, New York.

"The author gives a splendid picture of that magnificent court and the conditions which eventually brought about the revolution. The precarious position of every member of that court from La Pompadour down to the meanest lackey, whose very lives were in constant danger from the whims of the weak but self-indulgent king, is made very real by the author."—Globe-Democrat, St. Louis.

Illustrations by John Ward Dunsmore. 12mo, Cloth. $1.50

FUNK & WAGNALLS COMPANY, Publishers
NEW YORK and LONDON


MISERERE

By MABEL WAGNALLS

Author of "Stars of the Opera," &c.

A brief, but beautiful romance in which the discovery of a rich and powerful voice leads ultimately to a climax as thrilling as the death scene in "Romeo and Juliet." The story is told with simple grace and directness, and is singularly pathetic and forceful.

"It is perfectly delightful. The theme is new and interesting."—Ella Wheeler Wilcox.

"It is a story of tender and pathetic interest—the story of a woman with a wonderfully beautiful voice. A dainty and fascinating romance which will appeal to music lovers."—Chicago News.

"It vibrates with musical sentiment. There is a good deal of artistic skill displayed in its description."—Boston Watchman.

"A story unique in theme, delightfully told with many delicate touches."—The Arena, Boston.

Small 12mo, Cloth. Illustrated. 40 Cents, net

FUNK & WAGNALLS COMPANY, Publishers
NEW YORK and LONDON


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